ANALYSIS OF DIET PATTERN IN INDUS CIVILIZATION THROUGH ARCHAEOBOTANICAL AND ETHNOARCHAEOLOGICAL APPROACH

  • M. ISMAIL CHAKRANI
  • DR. QASID HUSSAIN MALLAH

Abstract

The human diet pattern has long history. It was systematically changed when all three first civilizations like Mesopotamian, Egyptian and Indus started using staple resources supplemented with hunting fishing and fruits collecting and produce byproducts like clarified ghee and pickle as their food.  To trace the food history, the people of Egypt and Mesopotamia has depicted pictures and kept written records of their activities associated with food and food production. Those records are further supported with physical data like bones, grains and residues on other objects.

In Indus civilization there is no absence of paintings or carving which explains the procedures of food preparation or cultivation activities. From Mohenjo-Daro and Harappa, huge grain storage is found. The charred seeds and plant impressions are found from several smaller settlements.  The figurines and terracotta models of plough ascertain the cultivation culture. The human skeletons also provide basic knowledge about the food and food types used by Indus Valley people but there are difficulties to reconstruct the process and procedures for cultivation and cooking. Therefore, in this paper focus is given to those factors which may help to reconstruct the hidden secrets and help to rewrite the history. In doing so, two types of the data are utilized (i) contemporary civilizations like Egyptian, Mesopotamian under “cross cultural approach” concept and (ii) Ethnoarchaeology which allowed looking into the traditional agricultural communities for comprehending and bridging the past.

This data set explained under two broader theoretical paradigms have thrown light on the process and procedures to be considered in archaeological explanation of diet pattern of Indus Valley civilization.  

Published
2019-03-30